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Stained-glass painting and grisaille

In actual glass painting the pane is painted with black or coloured grisaille. It can be applied either opaque or glazed. In order to achieve a permanent fixation, the glass is fired at 610° C. The colour layer can be removed before firing (scratching, wiping and dabbing).
In addition, enamel colours and silver yellow are used.

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Stained glass and glazing

In this technique, individual pieces of glass cut from paper templates are framed with a profile of lead and soldered with tin.

The lead profiles produce black lines when seen through, which give rise to the actual drawing.

This ancient technique can also be used to create contemporary works of art.

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Etching

In this technique, a multi-layered glass is deeply etched with hydrofluoric acid. The areas on the pane that are to retain the original colour are covered. The acid removes the upper layer of colour from the uncovered areas.

Glass panes can be frosted with another acid.

Sandblasting

Areas of the glass pane are frosted by sandblasting or matt etching.

The light is "scattered" through the surfaces thus designed and makes the glass, which is invisible in itself, shine.

Glass collage

By applying coloured glass panes with special silicones, it is possible to create stained glass without disturbing lead lines.

Multi-layered work is possible.

Cemented Stained Glass

In this technique, 2.5 cm thick glass plates are hammered into shape and cast in cement.

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Glass-Fusing

This very old and rediscovered technique allows several sheets of glass to be fused.

In order to fuse two pieces of glass completely, or to let them flow into a mould, the kiln is heated up to approx. 800°C. The fusing process is then repeated until the glass is completely melted. In terms of design, this process offers an almost infinite number of possibilities.

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Deformation by heat

The property that glass does not have a melting point but a softening temperature can be used to form glass sheets.

The panes sink in the kiln at a temperature of approx. 680°C. over or into a heat-resistant mould.